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Content Supplied by NHS Choices  

The more you know about your pregnancy and your options, the more you are likely to feel in control. The information given here is based on The Pregnancy Book, which your midwife should give you at your first appointment.   

Before you are pregnant

VACCINATIONS DURING PREGNANCY

Pregnant women & the Flu Vaccination

It is recommended that all pregnant women should have the flu vaccine, whatever stage of pregnancy they're in. This is because there is good evidence that pregnant women have an increased risk of developing complications if they get flu, particularly from the H1N1 strain.

Studies have shown that the flu vaccine can be safely and effectively given during any trimester of pregnancy. The vaccine does not carry risks for either the mother or baby. In fact, studies have shown that mothers who have had the vaccine while pregnant pass some protection to their babies, which lasts for the first few months of their lives.  

Whooping Cough Vaccinations will be offered to Pregnant Patients who are 28 - 38 weeks pregnant.

 
pregnant_lady1You will receive your Flu Vaccinations Letter via the post to ask you to come to the Surgery. Those Pregnant patients who are within 28-38 weeks of their pregnancy, please ask the Nurse who is giving you the Flu Vaccination, for the Whooping Cough Vaccination on the day.
 
In the UK, all pregnant women are now to be offered vaccination against whooping cough when they are 28-38 weeks pregnant. Getting vaccinated while you’re pregnant could help to protect your baby from developing whooping cough in its first few weeks of life. Children are vaccinated against whooping cough at two, three and four months of age, and again before starting school at about three years and four months of age. Read more about preventing whooping cough here.

Although the number of cases of whooping cough has fallen dramatically since vaccination began, it is still possible for children to get the infection, so having the vaccination is vital.

The more people vaccinated against whooping cough the less chance there is of them passing on the infection to a young baby in which it could cause serious, and possible fatal, complications.
The effectiveness of the whooping cough vaccination may fade over time meaning it is possible to develop the condition during adulthood if you were previously vaccinated.

For more information, please click here.

Your pregnancy and labour

You and your baby

General pregnancy topics

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